John "Chief Cucklemaker" Cale  ‎(I03508)‎
Name:
John "Chief Cucklemaker" Cale

Show Details Source: OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details:  Database online.
  Text: Record for John Chief Cale

   


Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 1750 Bertie, North Carolina, USA
Death: 1792 ‎(Age 42)‎ Where Ross Church is built
Personal Facts and Details
Birth 1750 Bertie, North Carolina, USA


Show Details Source: OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details:  Database online.
  Text: Record for John Chief Cale

Birth between 1750 and 1755
Marriage Elizabeth Marie Calais - about 1788 ‎(Age 38)‎
Death 1792 ‎(Age 42)‎ Where Ross Church is built

Death 1792 ‎(Age 42)‎ Bertie, North Carolina, USA


Show Details Source: OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details:  Database online.
  Text: Record for John Chief Cale

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Parents Family  (F11399)
Chief Cashie
-
John "Chief Cucklemaker" Cale
1750 - 1792

Immediate Family  (F01451)
Elizabeth Marie Calais
-
Charney Cale
1779 - 1860
Tilury Cale
-


Notes

Shared Note
THE LEGEND OF JOHN CUCKLEMAKER CALE ~ I

© Copyright 2003 by Stanley Hoggard, with
grateful acknowledgment to Neil Baker

Is the story of Chief Cucklemaker a legend or a fact?

Over a time span of 200 years or more, the story of an Indian who lived during the 1700s has been told by a multitude of people who claim to be his descendants. Today the descendants are many, and the majority have settled in Bertie and neighboring counties. All are familiar with and still tell the story of their ancestors, Chief Cucklemaker and his French wife Elizabeth.

According to information that has been shared with us, the original name of the Indian was "Chief Cucua Mucua." It is believed that early settlers altered the name "Cucua Mucua" to "Cucklemaker" through an error in spelling.

The stories have been received from different sources that live in different directions. Chances are, these people have never met, but they tell the same story ~ up to a certain point. The past existence of Cucklemaker is not very well documented, and for this reason a few people believe the "Chief" never existed. In the following paragraphs we will share some of the "scant" information we have received over the years. We hope you can provide answers to some of the questions we will be dealing with. If you have answers, let us hear from you.

FROM THE PAST

According to family information, the grandchildren of Cucklemaker told many stories about their Indian grandfather. They said that he was an Indian chief; that he married a French widow with three children from her first marriage, and produced two more children through her marriage to Cucklemaker. Information from many sources agrees that the name of his wife was Elizabeth Marie Calais Duneleaux. It is believed that the date of his birth was 1750-55, and his marriage to the French widow was about the year 1778.

One of the stories of the past informs us that Cucklemaker refused to become involved in clashes against other Indians. Because of this, sometime during the year of 1792 Cucklemaker was ambushed and shot to death at the same location where Ross Church was built 12 years later. The person who committed the crime was never apprehended, and his identification remains a mystery to this day.

Ross Church Community is located near the center of Bertie County NC. We are told that this is where Cucklemaker made his home, acquired much land and enjoyed prosperity. My father and several of his siblings were born in the late 1800s. They remembered their grandmother Penelope Cale Mizelle Hoggard and her stories about her father Charney Cale, and grandfather John Cale, Indian. According to the family, Charney and all his children had strong Indian physical traits.

Penelope's grandchildren repeated her stories as long as they lived. They told of how Cucklemaker acquired much of his land through "foot-racing" competition, that he was "swift" on his feet, and a long-distance runner of great endurance. There are many other stories of which we can't recall all the details. There are conflicting stories which we will refer to later.

Some of the land that Cucklemaker was "assumed" to have owned is located between Ross Church and Todd's Crossroads, a distance of one mile. At the half-mile point between these two locations there is a field on the northwest side of the road with a small creek on its northeast boundary. The name of the creek is Cucklemaker Creek. This creek is also known as Cucklemaker Swamp, and probably is a better description as it appears today. Near this small creek is a large mound of earth. According to tradition, somewhere within this mound are the remains of Cucklemaker and his French wife Elizabeth. Most people believe that the answer to many of today's questions about their family was buried with them, and that the facts may never be known with any certainty.

THE MOUND AND THE CREEK

The mound is generally referred to as the "Old Indian Graveyard," also the "Cale Graveyard." It is believed that other members of the Cale family were buried at this location. The mound is about 200 feet from the creek, and about the same distance from the road.

The mound is now covered with a growth of large trees and a thicket of "cat-claw" briars. In the field where this mound is located, shards of pottery, fragments of clay tobacco pipes, and arrowheads have been collected until there is nothing to be found of any significance. Some of these probably date back for hundreds of years.

Some people believe that the mound was either built or started by the early Native Americans. My mother, Bessie Miller Hoggard ‎(1899-1994)‎, told me some years ago that she attended the last funeral and burial at this site: The year was 1906. It is believed that some of the early members of the James Ross Log Meeting House ‎(Ross Baptist Church, organized 1804)‎ were buried at this location.

Due to the trees that have grown in the area, the mound is no longer conspicuous from a distance. We live near this site and can see the trees that tower over it from our home. Each time we see those trees we think of the Indians of the past.

Cucklemaker Creek is very small for the volume of water that flows through it. During periods of heavy rainfall water flows over its banks and floods the road and fields. Water in the creek flows in a southerly direction through Will's Quarter Swamp as it meanders on its way to Cashie River. The nearest area of the creek to the Indian graveyard was named the "Baptizing Hole" about the year of 1800. According to the early records of Ross Church, hundreds of people were baptized in this small creek, as they became members, summer and winter.

Some people believe that the creek was named after Chief Cucklemaker. Others believe that the creek was named before his time, and he named himself after the creek. Since the Indians had lived in this area many years before the arrival of Cucklemaker, we would think that they had already named the creek. It was unusual for creeks and rivers to be named for individual Indians; they were usually named for the tribes that occupied the area. However, if this creek was known by another name, chances are favorable that it was changed to Cucklemaker sometime during the late 1700s.

Cucklemaker Creek was known as Cuckold Maker Creek/Swamp, also Cockle Makers Creek/Swamp during the 1700s. Obviously, cuckoldry is to violate the vows of marriage through unfaithfulness. It is an old English name that is rarely used any more, and we are at a complete loss to understand why it could have been used to name a creek. Cockle is also an old English name, and is our choice as an early name for the creek.

When the English began to visit the "New World" that became America, they were fascinated with the "dugout" canoes that the Indians used. They told of the Indians "moving across the water at goodly speeds in their cockle shells." The English named the canoes "cockle shells" for their resemblance to the elongated cockle ‎(clam)‎ shells found in their homeland.

Cucklemaker Creek is noted for the tall cypress trees that grow near the stream. It is possible that Indians used the cypress to build dugout canoes, including the Indian known as Cucklemaker. If so, in the eyes of the English during the late 1600s through the 1700s, the Indians would have been known as "cockle makers," which could explain the name of the creek. The name "cockle shell" was "borrowed" from an Englishman's journal that was recorded during the early 1600s. Any connection with the name "Cucklemaker" is only speculation. However, it is known through the documentation of old deeds that the name was derived from a similar name many years ago.

~

THE LEGEND OF JOHN CUCKLEMAKER CALE ~ II

© Copyright 2003 by Stanley Hoggard, with
grateful acknowledgment to Neil Baker

Cucklemaker's Family

It has been told by different sources from opposite directions that the wife of Cucklemaker was a French Huguenot ‎(Protestant)‎.

These sources agree that her name was Elizabeth Marie Calais Duneleaux. She was the widow of a Frenchman, Henri Duneleaux, and gave birth to three children during their marriage, two males, and a female. The name of the female was Marie.

We have been told that she married John Mizell, who was a charter member of the Ross Log Meeting House built in 1804. The male children of the Duneleaux family were Henri II, and Hugh. The English version of the French name "Duneleaux" is "Dunelow," but was often written as "Dundelow." Henri II, the son, was said to have been a short man and was known as Henry "Lowhill" Dundelow.

It is interesting to note at this point that a man by the name of John Dundelow became a member of Ross Church during the month of August 1822. Researchers say that John Dundelow was the son of Hugh. More Dundelows, both male and female became members later.

When Cucklemaker married Elizabeth, we are told that he adopted the French name "Jean Calais," the name of Elizabeth's father. Later, according to the story, he anglicized to the English version "John Kail" ‎(Cale)‎. According to the rules of The Anglican Church ‎(Church of England - Episcopal)‎, Cucklemaker officially became an English subject if he anglicized to John Cale ‎(?)‎. This process required Cucklemaker to take an oath of loyalty to the British Crown, and gave him the rights and privileges of other Englishmen.

The verbal story of Cucklemaker states that he sired two children by Elizabeth: Tilury Dundelow‎(?)‎/Cale and Charney Dundelow/Cale. Little information has surfaced on the life of Tilury Cale. When we view the handwriting of the 1700s, we see the capital letters "T" and "S" were similar in configuration; the same with "u" and "v;" "r" and "e." For this reason, some people believe the name Tilury should be read as Silvey. However, some descendants believe that Tilury did exist; that he was born during the year of 1781, and later married Amilia Bryant. Some say that both Tilury and Silvey existed. Others say that there is only one person involved in these two names. Leading researchers have been unsuccessful in locating any information on Tilury, and now believe that he never existed. It is generally believed that all the Cucklemaker descendants were through Charney's family, which are many.

Charney Cale

There is no problem in documenting the past existence of Charney Cale. His date of birth is given as 1779-80. He married Elizabeth Harmon on October 24, 1804. According to the information we have, by the year of 1829 they had 12 or more children.

It is through these children and their descendants that the story of their Indian grandfather, Chief Cucklemaker, has traveled in all directions, and has survived for over 200 years.

Today the descendants of Charney Cale number in the thousands. After the death of Charney's wife Elizabeth, he married widow Judith Mizell December 20, 1848. Judith was the daughter of Moses Mizell Sr. She first married another Moses Mizell who became known as Moses Mizell Jr., son of William Mizell.

Charney Cale became a member of Ross Church during the month of August in 1824, and was baptized in the old Baptizing Hole at Cucklemaker Creek by Elder ‎(Rev.)‎ James Ross. For the next 20 years his name appears many times in the church minutes. On July 24, 1860, Charney Cale departed from this life. There is information that he was buried in the old Indian Graveyard at the side of his first wife, Elizabeth.

Soon after Charney and Elizabeth were married in 1804, he enlisted in the United States Army and served through two separate terms, including the War of 1812 against Great Britain. In both cases he enlisted as Charney C. Dundelow. According to the minutes of the old Ross Log Meeting House, Charney Cale was a prominent member and served several years on many important committees.

During a Ross Church meeting in January 1834, Penelope Mitchell Hoggard accused Charney of "spooking her horse, then acting disorderly afterward." The church investigated the case and cleared Charney of the charges.

The church "excused" him for having been "drunk" in June of 1845.

Charney was "excluded" from church membership in January of 1848 for "disorderly conduct." The old church minutes do not reveal what the specific charges were. There is no record that Charney ever restored his membership with Ross Church.

Charney's first wife, Elizabeth Harmon, became a member of Ross Church in September 1824. Charney's last wife, Judith Mizell, became a member in March 1832 ~ before she married Charney. Elder James Ross baptized Elizabeth and Judith in Cucklemaker Creek.

Two of Charney's slaves, Carter and Martha, were members of Ross Church. Carter became a member May 1843; Martha became a member September 1847. Elder ‎(Rev.)‎ Thomas Hoggard baptized both Carter and Martha in the Baptizing Hole at the creek.



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Sources
Name OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details:  Database online.
  Text: Record for John Chief Cale
Birth OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details:  Database online.
  Text: Record for John Chief Cale
Death OneWorldTree
Publication: Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Citation Details:  Database online.
  Text: Record for John Chief Cale

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Family with Parents
Father
#1
John "Chief Cucklemaker" Cale ‎(I03508)‎
Birth 1750 Bertie, North Carolina, USA
Death 1792 ‎(Age 42)‎ Where Ross Church is built
Family with Elizabeth Marie Calais
John "Chief Cucklemaker" Cale ‎(I03508)‎
Birth 1750 Bertie, North Carolina, USA
Death 1792 ‎(Age 42)‎ Where Ross Church is built
Wife

Marriage: about 1788
-9 years
#1
Son
Charney Cale ‎(I03344)‎
Birth about 1779 29
Death 24 July 1860 ‎(Age 81)‎ Bertie, North Carolina, USA
#2
Child